Software Projects to Watch

11/21/18 - Projects that are missing things, but I am nonetheless keeping tabs to see where they go.

I thought I'd list some projects that are great, but that don't quite have the features I need, so I'd really like them to be better. These are also projects I'd like to review in the future. I'm mainly talking about web software, but anything goes here.

List of projects I'm watching

  1. CMS.js: Looking to become a strong blogging platform, possibly even better than Pico due to its static design, but it is missing search and pagination features. It's also somewhat difficult to set up and has some properties that are bad for UX. Still, it's blog-aware! And static! It almost draws me away from PicoCMS even without pagination and search! I previously heard about MDWiki, which is a wiki generator that runs client side and even more easily than CMS.js, but MDWiki is no longer developed and still depends on old versions of Bootstrap and JQuery.

  2. WonderCMS: A good CMS with a built-in admin plugin, but it lacks any sort of blogging capability, and would be much better if Markdown were available for page editing.

  3. Bolt CMS: Another great CMS, Bolt has an alluring array of features, including blogging support, an admin backend, and a larger community.

  4. Grav: As you can see I did a great deal of research into content management systems. Most of it was before I made this website; I wanted to use a flat-file CMS, and had to choose which flat-file CMS to use, Grav is the most widely used flat-file CMS, and look at that list of features! The only reasons I didn't use it myself was because it required a newer version of PHP than I had access to at the time, it seemed more difficult to theme, and my tests on newer versions of PHP found it riddled with bugs.

  5. Mosh: Promises to be a way better alternative to SSH, but there isn't much external support available for it.

  6. Browsh: A command-line-based browser that uses headless firefox. It can ruin your Firefox configuration if you try to use it and doesn't play well with animations, also keyboard control is limited, but it somehow supports images and video, putting it far above other command-line browsers like Lynx. I reviewed Browsh here.

  7. Falkon: First there was KDE Konqueror, but no one updated it anymore, so KDE needed a new browser. Then there was QupZIlla, and for its 3.0 version it joined the KDE project. And it was renamed to KDE Falkon. QupZilla was a great browser, and Falkon continues to live up to its name. If it can get past a few bugs, Falkon could become my new favorite browser.

  8. Node.js: An up-and-coming alternative to PHP. Javascript isn't my strong suit, though, and most of the best web software are either static (like CMS.js) or PHP-based.

  9. NixOS: I'm an avid Linux user, so when a distribution comes around that's as technically exciting as NixOS or its GNU-developed cousin GuixSD, I am very interested. Sadly, both remain hard to install.

  10. Pico Content Editor; Could be a very useful content editor for PicoCMS, making good use of the other Users plugin, but currently lacks the ability to add new posts and is very difficult to implement. It's last here because there don't seem to be any plans to resolve my issues.